Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout Review

Developed by: Mediatonic
Published by: Devolver Digital
Platforms: PlayStation 4, PC
Release Date: Out Now


Since the reveal trailer in the 2019 Devolver Direct, Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout has been a game I have had my eye on, and the decision to make it a PS Plus game this August has served to put it even more in the spotlight. Built around a simple premise, being the sole survivor of 60 players in a random selection of obstacle courses and team games, it’s ingenious fun that especially comes alive when playing with others in a group. There are elements of the game that could be improved, with some obvious gaps in the offering, but the overriding chaotic fun of trying to bundle your way to victory and the Crown does a lot to cover up for them.


One Way Through

Fall Guys has one mode, and one mode only, that throws you into the action with 59 other players in a new take on the battle royale structure. This time, the genre has been given a Total Wipeout-esque twist (sadly without Richard Hammond) with your primary goal being survival as you progress from course to course with only the actions of jumping, diving, holding onto other players, and your custom theatrics (essentially an emote). Each stage you play through whittles down the group until a final round where the sole remaining player earns themselves the lucrative and sought-after Crown. From my experience, there tends to be around 4 to 6 levels in each run of play, usually beginning with an obstacle course such as the battering Hit Parade and ending with one of the tense final levels designed to leave one player standing. In those mid-point courses, though, there is a varied selection, so you’re never entirely sure what is next, whether it be an egg-gathering contest or a memory match puzzle.

Of those currently in the game, there is a hierarchy in my mind of which levels I prefer to play; in general, the obstacle courses such as The Whirlygig – with plentiful spinning blockades – are much more satisfying to me, as they reward individual skill, in comparison to the team games, where you are much more at mercy to the overall ability of those you are put in with. For example, if in the Rocket League-style Fall Ball the rest of your team doesn’t play well, then you’re at a serious disadvantage. I’m not against the idea of having a range of stages to combat repetition and create that sense of chaos, but perhaps it would be wise to make alternate playlists for those who prefer playing certain types of course; these could have differing rewards so as not to detract from the value of the Crown. More modes would encourage me to play more, as the idea of playing certain levels puts me off the idea of going through the whole sequence again.

Patience can be an important skill in this game

The courses themselves are very well-designed overall, with clever tricks and side passages; I got the impression that even with the randomness, as you play more, you do get better. I’m very conscious that your personal favourites can vary from person to person, and the ones you perform better at can easily become the ones you prefer. Many of the levels aren’t actually that complicated in layout, but the real challenge comes from trying to navigate them with up to 59 others also stumbling through them, forming logjam and tripping hazards. Springy sound design and the unintelligible noises of determination from the characters provide quirky appeal; the physics of your character are purposefully awkward, easily falling and rolling around, losing you control – gaining and maintaining momentum are crucial for success here. Seeing everyone trying to get through pathways to not be eliminated is a delightful sight – they’re all attempting to make it, but not all can…


Fall Fashion

Even before I got into my first game, the energetic, vibrant, and colourful presentation of Fall Guys stood out to me as I waited in the lobby. That main theme music is audaciously funky and entertains me by itself in the brief waiting periods from game to game, pairing wonderfully well with the bubblegum-bright art direction. Pastel pinks, oranges, and similar are all over, combining with the soft, almost rubbery environments to create a very welcoming atmosphere that draws you in to the world created, leaving you to get stuck in the cycle of one-more-go as you chase victory. The endearingly clumsy avatars have a bunch of customisation options, from outfits to the theatrics emote. These are great for turning the group of 60 into a crowd of distinct personalities.

Leave see-saws how you find them, everyone

Upon release this has the illusion of being a free-to-play game, but really it isn’t, considering that you pay for PS Plus, and after this month it returns to solely being a £15.99 game. Hence, we must be careful about how we discuss the monetisation. Through gameplay, you earn Kudos, which is one of two currencies, with the other being Crowns, which you can only get by winning or by reaching certain level-up milestones. In the shop, you can use these to pay for various outfits and theatrics to add to your personal repertoire; these alternate each day, which adds some pace of variation, but this also feels a bit of a trick to me, when they could make all previous additions permanently there on the shop. It’s a trend emerging across these sorts of games that only limits choice.

Only the Kudos currency can be purchased with real transactions, with costume packs also available in that way. It’s not over-egregious, as you get a decent amount to spend just from playing, but these systems aren’t ones that leave a positive impression, especially when the game does cost money to initially buy – don’t let the PS Plus situation hide that. The game is in Season 1 right now, with Season 2 soon arriving (and new stages with it); as you play and level-up in-season, you gain new items. There is a decent pace of progression, so you are getting those moments of achievement to fuel you on, though the desire to amend past failures already brings a lot of motivation! Even so, having those real-money payments there is a temptation for those involved to make you spend that does not sit well with me.


Group Descent

All the emotions encouraging you to do better on that next go, that quickly turns into another go, and another, are only emphasised when playing with others in your party, which I have had the joy of doing; in-game, the only difference is that those players are marked out for you, and will automatically be in your team in applicable games. However, the change in urgency and hilarity is keenly felt, as your trials and tribulations are shared. A key difference to me is how when I was on my own, a slight fatigue did set in to the way the game only has one set routine of gameplay. When with others, though, every game has the added intrigue of where my friends are and whether they’re gonna make it; and even if I don’t myself progress on, I have an investment to see how they do. Those aforementioned team games I had complaints about work better too, as I know more about the team I am on. For one gem of an example of this dynamic, see the video below of two friends of mine (one of which recorded this, thank you!) and I, as one of said friends has an encounter with another player…

Another slight and general criticism I have of Fall Guys is how it feels unpolished. It’s the little details, such as when you are grouped up with friends, and the spectator camera doesn’t prioritise them, meaning you need to cycle through everyone to find those perspectives – additionally, it doesn’t stay with them from one round to the next. Further to that, and my comments about the lack of modes, why not allow us to make custom playlists of stages for just us and our friends, or maybe add sliders to adjust aspects just in those private games? Fall Guys has a really fantastic base concept that could be added to in so many creative ways. Yes, this is a game that may well get those additions, but if this is how you launch, then this is where the game is judged. As well as this, the visuals, though charming, aren’t always very refined, and the choice of typography for most of the text is quite a generic option. They’re all small aspects, but when all improved together, it elevates the entire package.


Final Thoughts

On occasions, a simple premise, with the right delivery, can form a brilliant party game to strike just the right note and resonate with an audience. The decision to make Fall Guys a PS Plus game has opened up the game to an audience that may otherwise not have paid the £15.99, and has created a multiplayer phenomenon that I am confident shall thrive and be added to over time. As I just talked about, there are many areas here and there that I was slightly disappointed by whilst playing, as my mind wandered to imagine how great this game could be. It’s a game that shall evolve over time, but without guarantees, they’re omissions that affect my enjoyment. A game that provides joyous entertainment and many passionate reactions, Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout is a game I imagine I shall be playing for a while, and hopefully it fulfills the potential as that happens.

7/10

Rating: 7 out of 10.

7 thoughts on “Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout Review

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  3. I only have recently started this and I am having a lot of fun with it.
    I really hope they can add a vote option A or B for the next challenge option to this as it would solve a lot of issues I have with the game. I play it on Steam though so I also need a stricter cheater ban!

    Liked by 1 person

      • If they are always voted against they can pull them and replace those with ongoing seasons. Cheating on pc is heavy, with people instantly finishing, auto jumping of even flying/glitch launching them. They are working on it though.

        Like

      • Yeah that is fair, I would appreciate more options to at least slightly customise the Rounds being played – I am confident they will arrive eventually though. As with the cheating; Mediatonic is relatively small compared to other developers, they need some time to sort it all out. No wonder they’re trying to hire more people! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: Let’s Chat: Definitively Ranking Every Fall Guys Round | WCRobinson

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