Resident Evil: Revelations Review

Developed and Published by: Capcom
Platforms: 3DS, Wii U, Switch (Reviewed), PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, Xbox One, Xbox 360, PC
Release Date: Out Now


There have been gaming series that have been a noticeable hole in my gaming knowledge over the years. Resident Evil had long been one such gap, and so, especially with COVID-19 leading to more time spent at home, this has been a series I have dedicated a lot of time to playing through in 2020. Just, y’know, without trying to see too many parallels with recent events… I am going to write up reviews for multiple games I have played in the series, starting with the one I began with: Resident Evil: Revelations!


All Aboard

This may seem an odd place for me to start the series, considering it is set after Resident Evil 4 and before Resident Evil 5. Hear me out, though! The digital versions of Revelations and the sequel Revelations 2 are often discounted on the Nintendo eShop, and they were very appealing impulse purchases for me; purchases that led to me playing many other games in the series too, as Revelations got me hook, line, and sinker (yes, ship puns are very much going to be present in this review). This is a game that was originally released on the Nintendo 3DS back in 2012. I still have clear memories of Official Nintendo Magazine having the exclusive reveal… as if this game was EIGHT years ago?! Time flies. There were then HD versions released in 2013, and next-gen versions in 2017; the 2017 Switch release is the one I am reviewing here.

Revelations is mostly set on board the Queen Zenobia, a cruise ship in the Mediterranean Sea. BSAA (Bioterrorism Security Assessment Alliance) agents Chris Redfield (Hiroki Touchi/Roger Craig Smith) and Jessica Sherawat (Nana Mizuki/Ali Hillis) have gone quiet after going there on a lead about bioterrorist organisation Veltro, so Jill Valentine (Atsuko Yuya/Michelle Ruff) – who you play as for most of the game – and Parker Luciani (Mitsuru Miyamoto/Kirk Thornton) are sent after them. Veltro are attempting to infect 1/5th of the water of the planet by contaminating it with the T-Abyss virus, which, well, isn’t ideal. The Queen Zenobia is a brilliant location for the survival horror qualities of Resident Evil, having plenty of cramped spaces and narrow corridors to keep you in a constant feeling of suspense. It’s an ingenious setting; the idea of being stuck on an enclosed ship full of monstrosities in the middle of an ocean works so well at escalating the stakes of every encounter. The creepy, mostly empty spaces of a luxurious cruise ship supply that classic horror vibe that the series went away from – for better or worse – in Resident Evil 5.

Jill Valentine and Parker Luciani, the pairing at the beginning of the game

A focus on series regulars Jill Valentine and Chris Redfield really anchors the story and provides a solid base from which to then learn about the new characters that accompany them. There are plenty of Resident Evil-style twists and reveals in the game that keep the story cruising along nicely. This game has a really cool narrative approach, splitting the story into 12 parts that are presented as TV-style episodes, with a recap of previous events at the start of each. Not only does this add a neat cinematic edge to proceedings and an opportunity for exciting cliffhangers, but it really suits the handheld nature of the original game and, subsequently, the Switch version. Being able to play an episode or two at a time – perhaps even in bed with the lights off – in the way you might view a TV show has a satisfying pace to it.


Ship-shape

Speaking of which, the visual upgrades this game has had since the 3DS original are impressive, to the point where it would be hard to tell it was a 3DS game without knowing. On that console there was understandable constraints on the visuals that could be achieved, but the updates bring the game to a comparable level with the latest version of Resident Evil 5, the game next in the timeline of the series – though, note that the 3D visuals of the original are lost. The character models are impressively detailed and have engaging voice acting, a key element in the genuinely dramatic moments in the game. On the point of audio, there is a noticeable effort at spooking you out with ambient sounds as the stranded ship creaks and shudders whilst you explore it. Then there are the noises made by the enemies infected by the T-Abyss virus…

Revelations isn’t all on the Queen Zenobia; for example here with Jessica Sherawat and Chris Redfield

Said enemies have a different appearance in Revelations. Instead of the more traditional zombies of earlier Resident Evil games or the much more human opposition of Resident Evil 4 and 5, here you are facing pale, shambling creatures that appear as though they are melting away after being infected. You face off against several different types of these gloopy attackers – some are dangerous at close range, some can fire at you from afar… oh, and of course, one has developed a chainsaw-like aspect, because, of course. It is a nice touch to be able to hear enemies before you see them – the sound of that chainsaw one still sorta haunts me.

When analysing the presentation, though, the game isn’t without rough edges, and some parts of the cruise ship can get samey in terms of the murky, damp colour palette; even if arguably that also contributes to the claustrophobic atmosphere of the game. To be fair, there are sections of the game where we cut away from the cruise ship and get some different environments, such as a flashback to Jessica and Parker in Terragrigia when Veltro attacked it, or when fellow BSAA agents Quint Cetcham (Naoki Bando) and Keith Lumley (Daisuke Ono) follow in the footsteps of Jessica and Chris to a snowy, mountainous area. That latter environment in particular is a nice contrast to the cruise ship, a much more open space that gives you a short moment to breathe before being plunged back into the tension of the Queen Zenobia. In terms of the story I found the sections playing as Jill the most engaging, but those cutaways help add a bit of variety to Revelations.


Swimming? In Resident Evil?

In terms of actually surviving these locations and the horrors they throw at you, the gameplay is in the vein of Resident Evil 4 and 5 – which makes sense – with a third-person over-the-shoulder perspective. Maneuvering around in the tight spaces can be – intentionally, it seems – quite clunky, and contributes to the threat of enemies around you. Conversely, though, you can move and shoot at the same time (not always the case in this series!) and there are some other neat tricks available to you, too. You can quick-turn on the spot, run, and use melee attacks when enemies are compromised by your gunfire (Jill has a particularly awesome spin-kick). You can even swim! For a series that often restricts your options, it is pleasing that Revelations removes some of those barriers whilst maintaining an air of threat.

You can play as a variety of different characters in the Raid Mode

A vast range of weapons are available, from pistols and submachine guns to a selection of grenade types, and this gives a fun amount of options to try. Furthermore, you can modify the traits of weapons to suit your own playstyle. There is also a scanner, named the Genesis, which allows you to seek out hidden items in the environment. This is actually really helpful, as Revelations severely limits the amount of ammo and health you have at any one point. Giving you more movement options but limiting the amount of supplies is balanced well; it makes me feel as though you can really make a difference through player skill and utilising those supplies efficiently.

Your repertoire can also be put to the test in the separate Raid Mode, where you can play sections of the game in different ways and go for high scores. This is also a way to get access to different weapons and unlock new outfits for the characters. It’s a comprehensive offering, and the progression system encourages you to keep playing – it adds a lot of longevity to the game beyond the main story, and also provides the option of playing with a friend over local or online co-op. There is a distinct sense of attention to detail, with a lot of customisation choices for the player – other examples of that are the retro-style game that can be played when loading up the game, and the functionality that allows you to scan amiibo to get more BP to spend in the Raid mode. So… Jill Valentine amiibo? Jill Valentine in Smash? Okay, William, I am sensing it is time to wrap up now…


Final Thoughts

Resident Evil: Revelations has been my entry point into the franchise, and my thorough enjoyment of the game paved my way to playing others in the series. The way the game has been adapted to newer consoles is impressive, and the episodic story holds up well with a welcome emphasis on survival horror. Some of the scenes away from playing as Jill Valentine lack a bit of identity, especially when with only new characters, but these aren’t the focus and there is admittedly merit to be found in how they help break up the game. With intense gameplay and a rich, atmospheric vibe, Resident Evil: Revelations, is, well, a revelation.

8.5/10

Rating: 8.5 out of 10.

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