Uncharted: The Lost Legacy Review

Developed by: Naughty Dog
Published by: Sony Interactive Entertainment
Platform: PlayStation 4
Release Date: Out Now


While we may have expected Naughty Dog to release DLC for Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End, I’m not sure how many of us thought that instead they would release a full game! Uncharted: The Lost Legacy is set not long after the events of Uncharted 4, and stars Chloe Frazer (Claudia Black) and Nadine Ross (Laura Bailey); you play as Chloe throughout the game, but both characters, and their relationship, are very much the focus. So, how does this departure from the Nathan Drake-led games of before turn out? The short answer is very, very well.


It Takes Two

Set in the vibrant country of India; The Lost Legacy starts with Chloe undercover and browsing local markets whilst tracking insurgent leader Asav (Usman Ally). Both are after the legendary tusk of Ganesh – Chloe for personal reasons, as her father died in his hunt for said tusk, and Asav in order to subsequently spark a civil war in India. On the way, we meet up with post-Uncharted 4 Nadine on a rooftop, and it is clear that whilst these two have a professional arrangement, neither is particularly friendly towards the other – their personalities are very much conflicting, with Nadine an efficient planner and Chloe more of the improvisation type. After a tense meeting with Asav in his office where sides are chosen, the pair make an escape in a daring chase sequence. Stealing a map and crucial artifact on the way, they set course for the Western Ghats to continue their search for the tusk.

After her absence in Uncharted 4, it is great to see Chloe again!

That opening sequence does a decent job at re-introducing the gameplay of Uncharted, including some of the newer stealth options brought in by Uncharted 4. However, Chloe is immediately dissimilar in subtle ways from Nathan Drake, in terms of her own unique silky swagger of movement and more of a tendency to use those undercover tactics – take her proficiency at picking locks as evidence of that. Even early on, there are some fun subversion moments thrown in, such as when the obligatory push-this-so-you-can-climb-it Naughty Dog puzzle instead turns into inadvertently and unintentionally taking out the floor! Especially for those who got used to the gameplay cycles of Uncharted 4, this adds a freshness that reminds you this game has ideas all of its own.

Once we get to the Western Ghats, the game really kicks off in earnest. Very soon you find yourself in a mini-open-world, with a vehicle to help get you around; imagine the Madagascar section of Uncharted 4, but larger and with more detail to it (and plenty more secrets to find!). It also reminds me a lot of the modern Tomb Raider games and their connected open areas; I find it fascinating how these two series seem to inspire and learn from each other game by game as comparable action franchises. Exploring this space of The Lost Legacy is a delight – there is a main plot thread, but you can spend as long as you like finding every nook, cranny, and collectible. As well as the Treasures that are a staple of the Uncharted franchise, there are also conversation points and photo opportunities at certain locations to keep you busy.


Capture the Moment

It’s not difficult to see why Chloe would keep photographic evidence of the trip, either. The Lost Legacy is gorgeous, and this initial area is a fantastic example. The lush grass and foliage, the sun-beaten rocks, the structures of Hindu religion… the game is constantly encouraging you to explore it, and it really drew me into the grand Indian adventure. Naughty Dog have become so proficient at creating lively game worlds, and a reason for that is their attention to detail. The way mud trails rupture behind you as you wrestle your jeep up slopes, or the restless way waterfalls cascade down a path, and plenty more authentic touches all work towards engrossing you in the world.

That’s a lot of waterfalls

With competition for obtaining the tusk, though, it isn’t all admiring the view. There are many combat scenarios with the insurgents for Chloe and Nadine to weather, and a range of enemies means you have to switch up your approaches (I mean, come on, when are we gonna be the ones with helicopter support?). The gunplay is – unsurprisingly – very similar to that of Uncharted 4, but there are a few new mechanics and opportunities; many combat areas have crates that, once Chloe picks the lock, give access to grenades, rare weapons, and more. I appreciate the distinct effort to provide options to be stealthy, with lots of tall grass (where is Link when you need him?) and the introduction of silenced weapons. On the other hand, and this could partly just be me, it seemed that the positions of enemies and the routes they take aren’t well-designed to facilitate a quieter approach. I often found it difficult to get through more than one or two people at a time without being spotted and then having to resort to either running away and hiding, or fully engaging in the gunfire.

The actual feel of the combat is rewarding in its smoothness, with transitions between weapons responsive and various cover options. As is my complaint for all the Uncharted games, my main problem with the combat is just how much of it there is, especially when the game is trying to tell me an emotional story about characters and who they are. If the game was designed more around the stealth options this would be slightly less of an issue. The narrative dissonance is very noticeable in the Uncharted series… With the exploration areas being so wonderful to play, I would say that there could be combat scenarios taken out without harming – and possibly instead improving – the overall game.


Frazer & Ross

Which is a nice segway into discussing the narrative of The Lost Legacy and how it develops the main duo of Chloe and Nadine. They may not start out on the best of terms, but from there the game oh-so-gradually has their relationship naturally develop as they spend time together in their pursuit of the tusk. Driving around at the start of the game provides many insightful exchanges of words that give them, and us, more info about them as people and how they got to this point. Chloe is much more knowledgeable about the Hindu Gods and Nadine noticeably learns from her. Conversely, there are also moments of friction; in particular, one revelation threatens to derail it all at around the mid-point of the story (for spoilers, I won’t go into detail on this).

Chloe and Nadine are a formidable combination

Yet, as with many relationships, their bond is stronger for lessons learned. As you play further into the game, they both start to understand and relate to each other and their motivations more; their evolving dynamic results in many different types of moments, some dramatic, some funny, some action-packed, some heartwarming (all I shall say is: elephants). The light-hearted conversations produced from their contrasting personalities are so well-done, with the clash of the quippy, bold Chloe and the matter-of-fact, confident Nadine. These are two awesome, fiercely independent women realising that opening up to each other doesn’t take any of that strength away, and may, on the contrary, empower them more.

None of this would work as well as it does without the superb performances from Claudia Black and Laura Bailey, who seem to effortlessly put this range of emotions on screen. The dynamic they share never seems forced, and the extra time with these characters has endeared them so much to me. The performance capture of Naughty Dog is cutting-edge, but it isn’t just this alone that creates the cinematic feel. Not often mentioned is the use of camerawork and direction in Naughty Dog games – in The Lost Legacy, cutscenes are really well-framed to give the interactions the focus, even during more chaotic scenarios. I already enjoyed the scenes with Chloe in previous games, but I felt Uncharted 4 under-served Nadine. Here, she is given much more of an opportunity to show who she is as a person – including insight into ramifications of the events of Uncharted 4 – and by the end of the story, my perspective on her had changed in a very positive way. Personally, I reckon more games featuring this lead duo would be an awesome idea!


Lend Me a Hand

Towards the later stages, (and again, I won’t go into much detail because of spoilers) there are new obstacles and characters introduced, but the brilliant dynamic of Chloe and Nadine remains the focus, and these new factors only give them more to bounce off of. Asav hasn’t got that many scenes, but he poses a threat and has a sort of upbeat villainous air to him that held my attention when he did appear. There isn’t much depth given to him and his reasons for doing what he is doing, but as a reason for Chloe and Nadine to work together it works well enough.

After that open area at the beginning, The Lost Legacy reverts to the linear level design of much of the Uncharted series, but I wouldn’t say that it is an outright negative change; having some of each type of environment design actually keeps you on your toes as a player. Now, these are very different games overall, but it reminds me of the combination of traditional, linear Routes and the new, open Wild Areas in Pokémon Sword and Shield and how that satisfies both angles of gameplay. With these more direct paths, the puzzle solving becomes more of a focus, and there are some amazing set pieces.

The puzzles get quite intricate (and, y’know, deadly)

I’d go as far as to say this game takes the Crown of Uncharted set pieces from Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception. It isn’t just for one set piece, either; whilst the closing sequence of the game may seem the prime candidate, the puzzle-focused discoveries as you go through the capital of Belur are, in a way, one long set piece that I found genuinely fascinating. The way Chloe and Nadine act as expert and student to the Hindu religion creates such a conversational vibe that links up the cutscenes into a cohesive narrative journey. Also, I am really into these ancient discovery adventure games… maybe I should become an archaeologist?!

Of course, it wouldn’t be Uncharted without lots of climbing during this exploration. There isn’t much new to report here… You climb, you leap, you have (un)expected moments when your handhold gives way – it’s Uncharted, all right!. Solid stuff, if not surprising. The rope, introduced in Uncharted 4, is used again here to swing around and adds some variety of movement, but again we have seen it before; another new method or two of getting around would have been nice for a series where traversal is so core to the gameplay. With this being a separate game and not DLC, it’s harder to justify the areas where there is less innovation.


I’ve Been Here Before

In addition to the replay value of the story through different difficulties and the many collectibles, The Lost Legacy also comes packaged with the full multiplayer from Uncharted 4. There is some new content specifically centred around The Lost Legacy, but as a mode from another game you may previously have, it is hard to give too much credit for it reappearing here. Naughty Dog have continuously added to the multiplayer over time, so there is plenty of content there if it is an area you get invested in. The main appeal of the Uncharted games is the story, however, and the relative lack of that in multiplayer makes it feel slightly hollow as a result. If the idea of playing as various characters from the series in a competitive environment is to your tastes, though, then you may find enjoyment here.

This isn’t an example of stealth

Another return is that of Henry Jackman to once again compose a score for an Uncharted game. It is a credit to the acclaimed musician that it is no surprise the audio side of The Lost Legacy is so accomplished. The soundtrack has a crucial role in the exciting, adventurous tone of Uncharted, but it is equally important that this does not override the quieter scenes. Henry Jackman is successful on both fronts, contributing to the thrilling ride to the credits – where a licensed song is incorporated to energetically conclude the game!


Final Thoughts

Uncharted: The Lost Legacy just edges out Uncharted 3 as my favourite entry in the franchise (for reference, I haven’t played Uncharted: Golden Abyss). Much of the reason for this is the pairing of Chloe and Nadine and how their interactions develop over the course of the 10-ish hour narrative. The core Uncharted gameplay, flaws and all, is present, as well as the now-customary Naughty Dog high level of production quality. An emphasis on exploration and historical revelations really appealed to me, and it is also noteworthy that whilst The Lost Legacy is a full game release, it is sold at a lower price, possibly to reflect the aspects informed by Uncharted 4. It is currently unclear where the Uncharted series is going to go in the future, but if the games are of a similar quality to this, then I am very much along for the ride.

9/10

Rating: 9 out of 10.

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